How to start a union (…in Ontario) Part 1 – two paths to unionization

How to start a union (…in Ontario) Part 1 – two paths to unionization

The first in our new series on how to start a union in Ontario. Is it worth considering? Can you find an established union to represent you, or do you create your own?

Avant Law Participates in Free Mobile Legal Clinic at Lincoln Fields Mall

Avant Law Participates in Free Mobile Legal Clinic at Lincoln Fields Mall

Posted by on Apr 18, 2016 in Accessible Legal Services, News

On Tuesday, April 5, Daniel Tucker-Simmons teamed up with UofO law school professor Dr. David Wiseman and students from his Social Justice Practicum course to set up a free mobile legal clinic in Lincoln Fields mall.

Ontario Employment Rights: Questions Asked and Answered

Ontario Employment Rights: Questions Asked and Answered

I was recently welcomed by the Pinecrest-Queensway Community Health Centre, Employment Services division, to give an employment law primer to staff. Besides having a good laugh together, I was asked a number of great questions. Here are the answers.

Avant Law in the News: ACORN and Heron Gate residents rally to delay eviction

Avant Law in the News: ACORN and Heron Gate residents rally to delay eviction

Posted by on Nov 20, 2015 in News, Rights Activism

ACORN has been fighting hard for years to defend the rights of Ottawa’s low and middle income residents. Yesterday, ACORN rallied with residents in the Heron Gate community, fighting to delay eviction. Avant Law’s Daniel Tucker-Simmons attended and spoke to media.

Rights are fought for and won; laws are debated and passed

Rights are fought for and won; laws are debated and passed

Posted by on Sep 7, 2015 in News, Union Rights

This Labour Day, in addition to participating in local Ottawa events, we are happy to share Daniel’s latest article, published today on CanLII Connects. Daniel was asked to select a list of notable court decisions, based on his own criteria, and to write about them.

Fired for no good reason: a legal primer on wrongful dismissal for Ontario non-union employees

Fired for no good reason: a legal primer on wrongful dismissal for Ontario non-union employees

The law in Ontario is pretty harsh on employees who have been fired. For the most part, employers are at liberty to fire an employee for almost any reason, or even for no reason at all. However, an employer’s power to dismiss without cause isn’t unlimited.

Welcome Overhaul of Ontario Employment Standards

Welcome Overhaul of Ontario Employment Standards

The Stronger Workplaces Act changed Ontario employment standards, making complaints more feasible for recovering back-wages and seeking compensation for standards violations. The changes also expanded protections to previously-excluded foreign workers, and bolstered standards for precarious workers in temporary help agencies.

How Do I Submit an Employment Standards Claim?

How Do I Submit an Employment Standards Claim?

If you’ve been wronged in the workplace, an employment standards claim may be an option. What’s involved to make an Ontario employment standards complaint?

Constructing dismissal: recognizing when your employer is pushing you out, and what to do about it

Constructing dismissal: recognizing when your employer is pushing you out, and what to do about it

Constructive dismissal describes a situation when your employer has changed your terms of employment — including salary, position, location, tasks or responsibilities — to the extent that the law considers you to have been effectively fired from your old job and hired into a changed one. You may be entitled to a notice period or compensation.

Behind the times: SCC affirmation of right to strike recognizes reality

Behind the times: SCC affirmation of right to strike recognizes reality

Posted by on Feb 9, 2015 in Court Decisions, News, Union Rights

When the Supreme Court of Canada recognized the right to strike in SFL v. Saskatchewan, it curtailed the Canadian state’s ability to intervene and suppress striking activity. Which means that the state is now [somewhat] more limited in its ability to suppress — through police violence or toleration of employers’ thugs — striking workers on behalf of employers, as it did so frequently in the past. That limitation, however modest, is unquestionably a victory for workers.